Author

J. S. Anderson

NOW AVAILABLE–BOOK OF HOURS: UNHOLY ERROR

2600x1667BOOK OF HOURS: Unholy Error, is now available for your reading pleasure in both e-book and paperback formats.

An “extremely entertaining read,” said one pre-publication reviewer.  “I particularly like your wonderful descriptions, and the way you introduce enough questions to keep us wanting more,” said another.

In this second volume of a trilogy, Brother Alphaios discovers torn pieces of parchment hidden inside the covers of the Book of Hours.  Though warned away by Prior Bartholomew, he pursues their meaning until he learns their thirteenth-century secret–personal testimony of a crime which could undermine one of the very pillars of the Catholic Church.  With the Church seeking to destroy it, and real estate mogul Salton Motice demanding its return for nefarious purposes, Alphaios must find a way to protect the parchment for the truth it tells.

Available through Amazon.com, barnesandnoble.com  and nook, Kobo and Smashwords.  On the author’s website, just click on the link to the bookstore of your choice on the side-bar and order your copy today.

Enjoy the read, and check out the website contest… Continue reading

BOOK OF HOURS: UNHOLY ERROR—AVAILABLE OCTOBER 25 !!!

2600x1667Once again in its long life, the Book of Hours was in danger.  And Alphaios had put it there…

While recreating a resplendent fifteenth century Book of Hours as a gift for the pope, Brother Alphaios and archivist Inaki Arriaga discover ancient shreds of parchment thrust into its covers.  Though warned away by a visibly shaken Prior Bartholomew, they pursue the few haunting words that remain only to stumble on a dark secret that undercuts one of the very pillars of Catholicism.  They find themselves in a battle between the Church, which wants to destroy the parchment or bury it forever, and its owner, real estate mogul Salton Motice, who wants to use it for nefarious purposes.

Meanwhile, the brothers of St. Ambrose learn that Motice intends to buy their mid-town cloister and replace it with a skyscraper.  The monks will be displaced from their home of nearly two centuries with no certainty at all about their future.

Wandering the city, Alphaios finds a strange young woman obsessed with painting enormous replicas of master artworks under one of the city’s great bridges, and a couple who, decades later, are still coping with having to flee from… Continue reading

A MOST GRAND AND EXCELLENT GOOGLE SEARCH–A POSTSCRIPT

img_1729-1Sometime during the afternoon of my visit to his home along the Sandy River, Father Palladino asked if I knew he’d been in a movie.

After his other startling revelations, this was just one more teaser.

Well, he qualified, his name had been in a movie.

While teaching calligraphy at Reed College, he said, he’d had a student in one of his classes–a young man who’d subsequently dropped out, though not before he’d returned for a second term studying and practicing the craft.

It was clear he wanted me to ask who the student was, and I did.

Steve Jobs, he replied.

Steve Jobs?  Studying calligraphy?

Father Palladino did not philosophize about the matter with me then and there, though he’d likely often done so with others.  He left me to wonder alone what it was about Steve Jobs, the great technological innovator of global consequence, which drew him to calligraphy–and not for just one college term but two.

It seemed to me this must provide a window in to the mind and motivation of the man, the titan.  Was it as simple as the elegance of the artform?

How would elegance fit into a mind of… Continue reading

A Most Grand and Excellent Google Search—Part 4

IMG_3775More interesting to me than the little book of Latin abbreviations was the story of Father Robert’s life, both because his early years were so similar to those of my character Brother Alphaios, but more-so for its trajectory, much of which was quite remarkable in mid-twentieth century America. In short, he was born in 1932. Entered a Trappist, cloistered monastery when he was seventeen. Professed as a monk some five years later and then as priest. Choirmaster for his brothers. Left the cloister after some eighteen years. Fell in love with the principal clarinetist of the Portland Symphony Orchestra. Resigned his collar and was dispensed from his vows by Pope Paul VI. Wedded the woman he loved and fathered a child. Became an instructor of calligraphy at Reed College. Was widowed only eighteen years into marriage. Petitioned the Church to return to the cloth. Was given papal dispensation, and once more became a seminarian and once more a priest. When retired, continued to serve numerous parishes when their clerics were ill or away. Passed away in February of 2016 at the age of eighty-three.

I would have liked to spend more afternoons with him, learned much more about his nature,… Continue reading

A Most Grand and Excellent Google Search—Part 3

097Yes, dear reader, we are in the midst of a serial blogpost…

Father Palladino, as I now knew him to be, invited me to his home (a small farm several miles southeast of Portland) and we settled on a time and date.  I asked for his address so I could MapQuest it, but he said he didn’t do computers; he’d mail me an address and map.  I decided not to tell him about Siri.

Several days later an envelope arrived, my name and address written in an elegant, oversized script.  Calligraphy, done by a master of his craft.  The manner of it, the beauty of it, elevated my day.  Inside the envelope was a letter of welcome, warm in its content and beautifully penned in the same letterform as the envelope.  Also enclosed was a hand-drawn map.  Gentlemanly manners at their very best.

Wending my way through an evergreen forest and down and across the Sandy River, I arrived to find Father Palladino waiting for me at a gate alongside the road.  He swung it open, closed it behind me and guided me down a curving,… Continue reading

A Most Grand and Excellent Google Search—Part 2

002bAnd so we continue…

Just a few months before, I’d had the pleasure of attending a series of seminars on ancient sacred texts—including illuminated books—at St. Martin’s University just up the road in Lacey.  They were given by an international panel of scholars of the Dead Sea scrolls and other ancient manuscripts.  They were paleographers, all four of them: experts in early languages, writings and religions.  Unfortunately for me, none of them had directly addressed the part of the craft I now needed to understand.  Even so, I called St. Martin’s and explained my problem.  No one here with that expertise, they said, and suggested that perhaps only Harvard University or Oxford might be able to help.

Daunted by that prospect, and preferring to meet with someone in person, I Googled “paleographer” and added the modifier “northwest United States”.  Nothing.  Deciding that the expertise I needed was more about the forms of scripts rather than their history, I typed in the words “calligraphy, northwest”. Down in the weeds I found a reference to Reed College in Portland (some forty miles south), and an undated press release.  In the last couple… Continue reading

A MOST GRAND AND EXCELLENT GOOGLE SEARCH–Part 1

IMG_1744It’s not often that a Google search is as productive as this one…

The principal character in my BOOK OF HOURS novels is Brother Alphaios, born into a poor village in Greece.  He entered a monastery as a young man as his only means to an education.  There he became a monk—a cloistered monk, one who lives entirely behind monastery walls. He showed considerable artistic talent, and was transferred to a cloister in Italy where he became a master painter and restorer of medieval books.  Now, in contemporary time, he has been brought to a metropolis in the United States—New York City.  Here, along with Inaki Arriaga, historian and archivist, he is recreating a large and magnificent but severely damaged Book of Hours from the fourteen hundreds. Together they oversee the work of two scribes who are duplicating the medieval text, its errors and anomalies included.  When done, it is to be gift for the pope, a gift for the ages.

I note above that Brother Alphaios is cloistered, which is only mostly true.  He has lived behind monastery walls virtually all his adult life, and has taken vows of strict prayer and obedience.… Continue reading

The Upside of Unfinished Art

San Xavier Unfinished

The subject of a recent radio segment on NPR’s Morning Edition was an ongoing exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It’s titled “Unfinished: Thoughts Left Visible”, and features some two hundred pieces of artwork which were never completed: paintings, sculptures, bronzes, reliefs.

The subject struck me perhaps because, I too, have hanging in my office an unfinished and unframed painting.  It is of San Xavier del Bac, the historic Spanish mission just south of Tucson, Arizona. The piece was abandoned, I suppose, when the artist became ill or died or just lost interest and moved on to other projects. It’s neither signed nor dated. I acquired it at a local estate sale, and didn’t pay much for it at all.

The strength of the artist’s colors draw me in: the rich, deep and variant blues of an active, stirring sky; the intense red ochre of the central façade; Burnt umber for the stone wall that surrounds the structure; the two white towers in the pink light and purple shade of a late Southwest evening. The west tower (the domed one) is more finished than the other, upon which the… Continue reading

Music in My Life: A Memoriam and Audio Recording

IMG_1449

On Sundays and too many special occasions to count, my aunt Marian Partner Cornish was for many years–decades–the principal alto soloist at the First Presbyterian Church in  Oakland, California.  It is a vast and grand venue with a great pipe organ at its front, conceived and built for the performance of great and aspirational music.   On Friday evenings and Saturdays, she sang in the same capacity for the Congregation Sherith Israel, a Jewish synagogue in nearby San Francisco.  She was a consummate vocalist.  (A recording of her singing Mendelssohn’s For the Mountains Shall Depart, is attached below.)

Most often when I think of Marian Gloria Partner Cornish, it is accompanied by a surprisingly vivid image. It is of Marian and her six sisters and one brother growing up in an impossibly small house set alongside an irrigation ditch in far-away Aberdeen, Idaho. It is with Marian and her sister Gayle Partner Hungerford in mind (whom I dearly loved as well), her sister Margaret Lacy, my own mother Florence and my Uncle Bob. I don’t have much memory of sisters Ethel and Josephine and Louise, but… Continue reading

NEW VIDEO TRAILER

I’m pleased to post a newly produced video trailer for Book of Hours:  The Beguilement of Brother Alphaios.

Many thanks to Mark E. Dykstra for the concept and production of the trailer.  I want to note that it contains music of his own composition as well.  Mark is a gifted painter and musician and composer, and has a number of book covers and trailers to his credit.

Click on the button below to watch.

It’s also embodied as a permanent feature under the “Books” tab above, and available on YouTube.

Thank you, Mark.  Well done.

Buy the Books:
Unholy Error: Amazon, Kindle, B&N, Nook, Kobo, Smashwords

The Beguilement of Brother Alphaios: Amazon, Kindle, B&N, Nook, Kobo, Smashwords
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