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Book Reviews

A TALE OF TWO BOOKS

IMG_0815 (1)aIf you’re drawn to stories of the art world (and who isn’t?), the beauty and the money and the chicanery, you might have considered picking up the following books. For me, aspiring writer that I am, they illustrated some of the differences between rather ordinary storytelling and the remarkable. I didn’t set out to make such a comparison, but the rather startling weaknesses of the first were all the more apparent upon reading the second.

The Art Forger is a debut novel by B.A. Shapiro (Chapel Hill: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 2013). Glossy and sexy, the cover is clearly intended to draw the attention of what I’ll call the airport patron: quick choice, disposable, and full of positive reviews (“engaging”, “addictive”, “ingenious and skillful”, “blazingly good”, etc.). It was the subject matter, though, that drew this reader.

It’s a twist upon a twist in the art forgery sub-genre: Is the stolen, now-recovered Degas the original work or a forgery? If the latter, is making a forgery of a forgery a crime? It’s an interesting concept, and in more sure hands it might have been pulled off.

For me, the term “insouciance” came to mind. (I can’t tell you quite… Continue reading

SUCK IT LIKE A FRUIT DROP

113“Because when I read, I don’t really read; I pop a beautiful sentence into my mouth and suck it like a fruit drop, or I sip it like a liqueur until the thought dissolves in me like alcohol, infusing brain and heart and coursing on through the veins to the root of each blood vessel.”

So says Hanta on the first page of Too Loud a Solitude, a novella by  Bohumil Hrabal (1914-1997).

What more could any writer wish than to have such a reader?

And, too,  the words are so vivid as to create the very physical sensations of which he speaks.

I considered posting the sentence with only a simple “wow,” but  found myself wanting to know more about these words and their context.

I was in for a surprise.

This happy sentence, chock full of the delights of discovery (and the savoring of it) stands out in the novella as brilliantly as a diamond—not so much for the quality of its construction or insight (for that is superb throughout), but in its brightness of mood. Too Loud A Solitude is full of oppression and darkness and even the putrid. And… Continue reading

Buy the Books:
Unholy Error: Amazon, Kindle, B&N, Nook, Kobo, Smashwords

The Beguilement of Brother Alphaios: Amazon, Kindle, B&N, Nook, Kobo, Smashwords
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