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THE BIRD THAT WOULD SOAR . . .

IMG_7650cSeveral recent blogposts notwithstanding, I have never been one to lean on the quotations of others, great or not. I have preferred most of my adult life—but to less effect, I suppose—a more experiential search for wisdom. So I have been surprised at the strength of my appreciation for the series of literary plaques set into the sidewalk near the New York City Public Library.

From the concrete below, a bronze rectangle faces upward to the sky and warns, “The bird that would soar above the level plain of tradition and prejudice must have strong wings.” (From The Awakening, an 1899 novel by Kate Chopin, 1851-1904.)

Lest one think only of race or ethnicity (and why might one not, for it is true there as well), the context for this particular remark is womanhood—the quiet constraints on the freedoms of women at the turn of the twentieth century. It would be two decades before the 19th Amendment to the Constitution finally recognized (not “gave”, as some might say, but recognized) the right of women to vote. That was a necessary step, but a hundred years later we know it was not anywhere near sufficient to dissipate the hard… Continue reading

OF STARS AND SOULS

122_2277a
At the World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C., there is an impossibly long wall of bronze stars—an abstract but instantly recognizable  representation of the heroes of war, the horrors of war, soldiers lost at war.

Each one of the four thousand palm-sized stars standing at attention represents one hundred lives lost. One star, one hundred fathers, sons, brothers, and yes, mothers, daughters and sisters lost at war.

Four thousand stars.

It is overwhelming.

I’d say inconceivable, were it only so.

122_2279aIn front of the wall lies a shallow reflecting pool.

Up on their wall, the stars are fixed in place.   Below, in reflection, they stir about, stretch, converse with each other. They reach toward their comrades and withdraw, reach toward the captivated visitor and withdraw.

Up on their wall, the stars are flotillas, regiments, squadrons.

In reflection, they are souls.

J. S. Anderson

Photos by J. S. Anderson:  Field of Stars, World War II Memorial, Washington, D. C.

GUEST BLOGS…

115_1507On April 18, 2014, The Editorial Department published a guest blog I prepared entitled “What Do I Know?”  It gives my take on the old stumbling-block of an adage, “write what you know….”  Yes, I have a grasp of several subjects, but what I know best is how I perceive the world around me, emotionally, intellectually, viscerally and visually.  And that opens up a world of possibilities.  Check it out:
http://www.editorialdepartment.com/blog/item/what-do-i-know

(The Editorial Department’s Peter Gelfan was the editor of BOOK OF HOURS:  The Beguilement of Brother Alphaios.)

On April 21, 2014, Lucky Bat Books,  my publisher, posted my guest blog  “Mr. Kissinger and Me.”  It tells a story I heard years ago about the famous Henry Kissinger, the former U. S. National Security Advisor and Secretary of State.  No, I didn’t remotely know him, but it posits a very high standard for one’s work—one which I think authors should keep in mind.  Here’s the link:
http://www.luckybatbooks.com/2014/04/mr-kissinger-and-me/

J. S. Anderson

Photo by J. S. Anderson.  Chiaroscuro at Park Headquarters, Saguara National Park West, Tucson, AZ

E-PUBLISHED! NOW AVAILABLE IN E-FORMAT

Book of Hours

BOOK OF HOURS: The Beguilement of Brother Alphaios, published by Lucky Bat Books (luckybatbooks.com), is now available as an e-book from the following e-book retailers, priced at $6.99:

 

AMAZON (Kindle)

 

BARNES AND NOBLE

 

KOBO 

 

SMASHWORDS (Discounted to $4.99 as an introductory special, through December only.)

 

BOOK OF HOURS  will be available shortly in paperback from these retailers, with a selling price of $16.95.

THE STORY:

A severely damaged fifteenth century Book of Hours, a man starving to death in a sumptuous art deco flat, an architect searching for the unconventional, a demonic old man, the tragic death of an infant and her father, a stolen human heart—

When Brother Alphaios comes to a great American city to recreate the Book of Hours, he must discover its origins and the heresies that kept it hidden away for six hundred years.

Finding himself an unwelcome guest in a cold, dour monastery, he becomes beguiled both by the audacious fifteenth-century illuminator he calls Jeremiah and the characters he encounters in the vast, chaotic city.  Reflective and experiential, Brother Alphaios is drawn to make his own bold statement—one final touch with his finest sable… Continue reading

Buy the Books:
Unholy Error: Amazon, Kindle, B&N, Nook, Kobo, Smashwords

The Beguilement of Brother Alphaios: Amazon, Kindle, B&N, Nook, Kobo, Smashwords
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